NaNoWriMo: A Completely Unprepared Journey

Standard

This is the second year that I have attempted NaNoWriMo. Last year I failed in a spectacular fashion. I think I ended up with maybe–maybe–10,000 words. This year, eight days into the month of November, I am at one-tenth of where I ended up last year. There are probably a series of reasons that I haven’t been up to par on the needed word count (only 1000 of the needed 13,000 plus). Lack of preparation, lack of motivation, lack of self-confidence? It could be one over prevailing fact, or it could be all three combining into a perfect maelstrom of not-getting-anything-done.

I’ve read, and been told, that any amount of words is good. That any amount of words means that you have a start on something, something to build on once you are ready. Right now, though, I’m feeling pretty unaccomplished. Obviously, even if I make the word count for NaNoWriMo, my book won’t be done. There will be editing, rewrites, editors reviews. After November there will be a long road ahead until I am actually finished.

But right now, on the eighth of November, 2014, I feel like I am far behind where I need to be. I feel like I am not going to ever get to that 50,000 word count.

But that’s right now. Tomorrow it may be different. I may get a burst of words done over the weekend. I could catch up within a few days. Who knows?

Perhaps it’s better to look at NaNoWriMo as a motivational tool. A tool to help me get out there and write. Write as much as I can. 50,000 words is a goal, but there’s no punishment if I don’t make it. And any motivational tool is good, whether or not you are able to completely achieve the end goal.

I’m going to keep at it. Maybe i’ll make the goal, maybe I won’t. I’ll keep you all apprised on the way.

How are the rest of you doing with NaNoWriMo? Is your word count exponential? Or lacking (like me)? Let me know in the comments below!

Ten Minutes to Oblivion

Standard

bridge to mystery
I don’t know why, but I’ve got a rather fatalistic attitude going into this NaNoWriMo. I don’t really have a plan. I’m sitting here ten minutes till November and I’ve got nothing but vague ideas, half characters, a stack of story ideas. In past years, I plotted and planned. I’ve gone the pantsing route before, too. Both have worked, and both haven’t. I don’t know, I guess I’m at a weird place in my writing. The future of Gone To Wonder isn’t quite set. I’ve got differing ideas for proceeding with my writing career.

It’s like driving into thick fog on a bridge. Everything is murky. Ahead of me, behind me, whatever direction. That’s how I’ve chosen to go. Into the murk, with nothing but a laptop. Wish me luck.

Panic Week 2014

Standard

Source: picjumbo

I’m sitting in an abandoned corner at the library, full of coffee, empty of hope. That’s because yesterday, I woke up in the middle of my work day and realized there is exactly one week left until NaNoWriMo kicks off.

This “oh shit” moment is brought to you by Déjà Vu.

Yes, this has happened before. Yes, it will happen again (most likely). Every year in fact. It inevitably gets to be late October and I suddenly remember there is this thing happening in November that I am very interested in but somehow completely misplaced inside my brainspace.

I can attribute that to one thing, the biggest fault I have as a writer, my secret shame: consistency. When it comes to daily writing, I fail. I admit it. I’m a streaky writer (that came out weird…). I’m as streaky at writing as Matt Duchene is at scoring goals*. When I’m on, I’m ON. Remember back in May? (Of course you do, loyal reader). I knocked out the last two-thirds of Gone To Wonder #1 in less than two weeks. It was insane, terrifying, exhilarating. I live for those moments as a writer. But they are rare, and that’s bad. Not just bad for production, that’s a bad habit as a writer, because you lose so much simply by not practicing.

That’s why WriMo sneaks up on me, and why I panic a bit when it does. It’s not simply about not being prepared. I can usually psyche myself up enough to at least start on November 1st (finishing is another matter). It freaks me out because it reminds me that I’m not treating writing like I should.

Look, I’ve come to have a very liberal view of peoples’ habits. I’m not going to say that the only way to write and write well is to be consistent. That may work for some, and it may not work for others. It’s important to find your own rhythm, regardless of what advice people have. But there is something scientific to the idea of practicing. It has to do with patterns of thought. You ever play a game so much that you find yourself dreaming about it? That’s because your brain has been trained to think about that game so much, it can’t stop itself. It’s for that reason that writing can be likened to an addiction, especially if it is going well. You do something so much, and you establish patterns of pleasure and reward, the dopamine singing sweet songs to your neurons, that it becomes habit forming. In the case of writing, it’s a good habit to have, because it means more words on the page and a higher likelihood of improving at the craft.

I think that is part of the point of NaNoWriMo. It encourages people to become writers, and trains them on how to establish consistency, whether they realize it or not. Every keystroke is a drum beat, and you’ve got to keep the rhythm. The years I have won, I wrote almost everyday. The years I didn’t, well, you get the picture.

So here I am at the library, having this little moment of epiphany. I came here to decide what to write (to sequel or not to sequel) and to plan and plot. But I’m realizing now that what I should be preparing myself for as much as the story or maybe even more is how to keep it up, how to keep the drum beating. If I figure that out, I’ll share my secret. If I don’t, I’ll share my failure.

If you’re participating this year, good luck, and feel free to share your strategies below in the comments, for my sake and for others. You can also add me/judge me all November long at the NaNoWriMo website.

*hockey reference ftw. also, hockey season is not conducive to writing, but who cares because hockey.

 

Bearded Blackout

Standard

Just a quick update for the sake of having an update. We’ve gone silent lately, not without good reasons. I’ve been working a couple of jobs and my time to do much beyond sleep and eat has dwindled to nonexistence. Andrew has his own stuff going on, too. But we’re still around, writing when we can. More importantly, November is approaching. You know what that means. NaNoWriMo. That’s what that means.

I’ll be planning some stuff for the blog for NaNoWriMo, nothing as blunt or presumptuous as “This is how you finish NaNoWriMo”, because, well, I don’t really know. I’ve completed the challenge half the times that I’ve tried. I’ve done some guide-like posts on my old blog giving advice and all that, but what I’ve really learned is that there’s no one way to do it, there’s no one way to write a book, there’s no story that progresses exactly the same as another. So instead of telling people how to write, I’ll do some stuff about how I’m preparing for it, and how it is progressing for me, and opening it up for others to share their own strategies.

That’ll do it for now. We’ll be posting regularly again soon. Thanks for sticking with us.

Comic Corner: Comic Book Week

Standard

Comic Con used to be the standard for the comics community. It was a festival that was devoted exclusively to all things comic and nerdy. So whenever it happened itt was, in essence, what you could call a comic book week. But Comic Con is not what it used to be. Instead of just a celebration of all things comics, it is now a celebration of all things pop-culture. That’s not a bad thing, but it leaves comic books without a true dedicated week to call their own. Well, I think that I have found one. I think that this week, along with being Banned Books Week, could also be called Comic Book Week. Let me tell you why.

1. Banned Books Week is all about comic books!

Banned Books Week this year is emphasizing banned comic books and graphic novels. Both Captain Underpants and Bone are on the top ten banned books list, and they are both graphic novels. And trust me, there are plenty more banned graphic novels out there that you should definitely be reading. While you’re out there getting one of those banned books at your favorite comic shop why don’t you…

2. Celebrate National Comic Book Day!

Yup. Today, September 25th is National Comic Book Day. It’s not the same as Free Comic Book Day, but there are still some deals out there for you can grab up. One of the better deals out there is ComiXology, who is offering up 25 different titles for free! I think I may just pick up a couple, or 25, of those titles myself.

3. Panels.net will be launching next week

Okay, it’s not technically within what I am calling Comic Book Week, but a pretty cool website called Panel.net is launching on October 1st. It has a pretty simple tagline–read comics, be happy. And, it is self described as, “A community celebrating comics, the people who make them, and the people who love them.” I’m pretty interested in what they have to offer, and I’m keeping an eye on them. If you want to keep an eye on them too, you can sign up here.

 

The Black Box

Standard
J.J.'s Mystery Box

J.J.’s Mystery Box

There’s a black box. Inside this box is a mystery. It’s contents are unknowable. You can put something inside the box, or many somethings, and the box, via unknown means, produces something else. How it works, why it works, and all manner of technical questions are fundamentally unanswerable. It just works.

The Black Box is a trope in fiction. There’s the Tesseract (and other Infinity Stones) in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, an object of immense power the characters do not understand. There’s the Source Code in Source Code. The Machine in Contact. There’s the magic box in LOST (kind of—more on this one below). The trope is a bit like a Deus Ex Machina* meets a Macguffin—the audience does not understand it, and most of the time the characters don’t either, but it is what wills the plot forward.

Got unknown alien technology? Black Box. Hyperspace drive? Black Box. Zombie virus? Depends on the show/book/movie, but yeah. Magic spell? Might be a stretch, but I’d put it under the black box umbrella. To use a Potter example, a witch may say a magic word, a wand may translate the word/gesture/intent, and out pops the result of a spell. How does it work? Rowling never explains, because she doesn’t have to. It is irrelevant, which can be a feature of a Black Box.

The Underpants Gnomes Phase 2 is a Black Box that hasn't been found

The Underpants Gnomes Phase 2 is a Black Box that hasn’t been found

This is a common trope, especially scifi, but it is also a phenomenon in the real world. Radiolab did an episode about it a while back, with three fascinating examples. The one I liked the best was the Piddingtons. I wholly recommend listening to the show, but here’s a brief breakdown of the story:

The Piddingtons were a married couple who had a popular radio program in the 50’s. They performed feats of telepathic prowess, the husband ‘communicating’ with his wife over some distance, to some stunt location, where she would repeat some phrase verbatim after divining it out via psychic waves. In short, they were doing a trick, the same thing a David Blaine or Cris Angel do today. Their job was to present something that the audience, no matter how determined, could not figure out. Like any magic trick, it was a misdirection. They forced you to focus on one aspect of the trick, trying to figure out the code or whatever, when the truth was much more mundane.

That’s the beauty (and the danger) of magic acts. The truth is, it’s a trick. No one bends the laws of physics. There’s no such thing as telepathy, levitation, talking to the dead, and so on. The good ones (see: Penn and Teller and The Amazing Randi) do not obscure this fact. They openly admit to lying. They are entertaining because they utilize a black box, which is usually their own minds. They know the truth, they know how the trick works, and they use that knowledge to misdirect you. It isn’t what’s inside the box, or what it does that matters, but the box itself is the draw, the thing that creates wonder and excitement.

The Prestige is one of my favorite films. A recurring theme of the film is the secret behind magic tricks, and whether or not the secret should be known. Radiolab, a show that is about science and getting to the bottom of mysteries, presents you a choice. On their website is a clip from Penn Jillette, in which he explains how the Piddingtons probably did their trick. You, the audience, are presented with the challenge: look inside the black box, or let the mystery remain. You might drive yourself nuts trying to figure out the secret, but if you take a step back and think about the entire situation, you may discover that the entertainment isn’t about what the secret is, but about how it affects you.

This, I think, is the key to speculative fiction. Every piece of fantasy, scifi, and lots of horror, requires a black box of sorts. It may not be a literal object or process in the story, but a more meta assumption that the rules expressed in the story just work, and that you don’t need to know how. The Force has an input—the focus and intent of the Jedi or Sith. It has a result, levitation, premonition, lightning, etc. How does it work? We don’t need to know. It is better without knowing.

A black box in science is what drives careers. A black box in fiction can make—or break—a story. But there’s another black box, that may never see the light of day, and that is the human mind.

A few years ago, J.J. Abrams did a TED Talk. In it, he described a mystery box he got as a child. He never opened the box, instead cherishing the mystery. It became a metaphor for the creative process. It even appeared in an episode of LOST, where Ben tells John Locke about a ‘magic box’ on the island that can produce whatever you want. John takes it a little too literally, and Ben has to remind him it’s a metaphor. To me, the black box is a perfect metaphor for that weird, nebulous thing we called inspiration.

Where do ideas come from? We can sort of trace their roots. The musician Josh Ritter once described it like a monster you must feed constantly.You read/listen to/watch whatever the monster inside decides it wants you to absorb, and once in a while it will regurgitate something useful, artistic, profound. In classical mythology, the Muses also fit the bill.

This is the ultimate Black Box. How do my story ideas become? How, even, do my thoughts become? I know I see and hear stuff, and I produce things for others to see and hear, but I don’t really know how it happens (this is different from learning the craft of writing). There’s a lot out there about philosophy of mind, cognition, archetypes and the collective unconscious, and all that jazz, but it has only ever told me half-truths, patterns, and how to recognize patterns. How do ideas happen? I don’t know. I’m not sure I need or want to know.

We can accept a black box in fiction because we ourselves are a black box. We are the trope, and while it may puzzle most of us for a while, if we take a step back, we find it isn’t how it works that ultimately matters, just that it works.


 

cover3I know what inspires me in my current series, Gone To Wonder: theme parks, steampunk, coming-of-age stories, new technology, and crazy adventures. I don’t know how they Check out the first episode in the series, Absent Hero, available for Kindle.